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Posted by Heidi Mahoney on 12/11/2017

As a senior citizen, selling a home and moving to a new location may prove to be difficult. Fortunately, we're here to help you take the guesswork out of packing up your belongings and getting settled into a new address.

Now, let's take a look at three essential moving tips for senior citizens.

1. Plan Ahead

Moving day can be long and stressful, particularly for seniors who don't plan ahead. If you start planning for your move today, you can increase the likelihood of a seamless transition from one address to another.

Think about your belongings and what you'd like to bring to your new address. If you have a wide assortment of items that you won't need at your new home, you can sell, donate or dispose of these items prior to moving day.

Also, if you need to hire a moving company, don't wait until the last minute to do so. Because the longer that you wait to hire a moving company, the less likely it becomes that this company will be available on the date of your move.

2. Secure Your Treasured Belongings

Although you've collected a large assortment of items over the years, you may be unable to bring all of these items to your new address. However, if you sort through your belongings, you can determine which items to keep.

Treasured belongings like antiques, artwork and jewelry generally are keepers. Pack and store these items properly to ensure they won't deteriorate before moving day.

Let's not forget about treasured belongings that have sentimental value, either. Photographs and other treasured possessions should be packed in a safe place and labeled correctly. That way, you'll have no trouble unpacking these precious belongings once you arrive at your new address.

3. Ask Friends and Family Members for Help

When it comes to getting ready for moving day, there is no need to work alone. Senior citizens who reach out to friends and family members for help can streamline the process of preparing for a move and enjoy a one-of-a-kind moving experience.

Friends and family members are loved ones who strive to help you in any way they can. Thus, if you contact friends and family members before moving day, you can work with loved ones to boost the chances of a fast, easy move.

Lastly, if you need extra assistance before you relocate, it never hurts to contact a real estate agent. This housing market professional understands the challenges associated with moving and is happy to help any senior citizen enjoy a stress-free move.

A real estate agent can put you in touch with local moving professionals. Plus, if you need help selling a house, a real estate agent can make it easy to list your residence, host home showings and much more.

Keep things simple as you get ready to move – use the aforementioned moving tips, and any senior can quickly and effortlessly prep for moving day.





Posted by Heidi Mahoney on 7/17/2017

Moving to a new house means big changes for everyone involved, but for a dog, it can be an especially confusing time. While you can talk to a child ahead of time to explain to them what to expect we, unfortunately, do not have the same ability to communicate with our beloved pets about the big changes ahead. The good news is, there are a few things you can do to make the move a smoother process for both you and your dog. Ahead of time - if it's close enough, visit the new house with your dog prior to moving to familiarize them with the new environment and neighborhood. Also, pack your dog's belongings (toys, bowls, bed, food) together so you can be prepared to pull it out first when you arrive at the new house. During the move - consider having your dog stay with a friend or doggy daycare on moving day. This will save your dog from the stress of their surroundings changing during the move. You also won't need to worry about where your dog is while doors are being left open or if they are underfoot during the moving process. If moving over a distance - take frequent breaks to let your dog out to walk around and avoid feeding him right before the journey in case they are prone to car sickness. Talk to your dog in a calm voice throughout the moving process to comfort them, they can pick up on our emotions so trying to remain calm yourself will cue to your animal that everything is okay. Stay safe - before letting your dog loose into your new yard you will want to ensure that it is free of potentially poisonous plants they may try to eat and check for any holes in fences they may try to squeeze through. You will also want to update your dog's tag and/or microchip with your new address and phone number. Maintain structure - keep old bedding and toys to give your dog some familiarity in their new environment. If you are looking forward to replacing their bed, waiting until your dog is settled into the new house is ideal. Stick to regular routines that were in place before the move where possible. This includes things like walks, feedings, and times you are away from the house. Have fun - when you arrive, allow your dog to explore the new house and yard. Take them for a walk around the new neighborhood, play their favorite game with them and get them tired out so they will be more relaxed when it's time to settle in for the night at home. Bonding time - spend quality time with your dog to reassure them that moving to the new home is a positive experience. Try to spend the first few days after the move at home with your dog to spend time with them and monitor how they are adjusting. Moving can be an exciting process for both you and your dog with a little bit of preparation. Setting up ahead of time before your dog's arrival to the new home and spending quality time together not only makes for a smoother move in experience but also gives you the opportunity to strengthen the bond between you and your dog!




Tags: moving tips   Dog safety   dogs  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Heidi Mahoney on 2/22/2016

There comes a time when families start to think about senior members moving. Factors such as retirement, finances, lifestyle, health or the distance between family members are just a few of the reasons why seniors may decide to relocate. Moving is a big decision especially when a senior has lived in one place for a very long time. Many things must be considered, including access to health care, recreation, social activities and practical concerns, such as grocery stores, libraries, climate, etc. Access to Quality Care For many seniors access to health care or options for health care assistance is the primary reason for moving. When considering options it is important look at the short-term solutions, but also consider long term scenarios. Options may include drop-in help, moving closer to a family member that can assist when needed or retirement communities that offer fully independent living to supportive assistance as required. Community Services It is also important to research the area community services. You will want to make note of services such as homecare, cleaning services, snow removal, transportation and home repair. Some individuals may want access to volunteer organizations or senior centers where they can be involved in the community. Support As an older adult, moving is an especially difficult transition. Finding the support the senior needs in the new community is imperative. Groups that seniors can connect with will help the transition go smoother. Connect with church groups, home visit solutions or perhaps meetings that would be conducted in a home setting. Here are some websites that may help you in your transition: •Eldercare LocatorAARPElder Web: Online Eldercare SourcebookAmerican Society on Aging (ASA)Senior Resource Housing: Information on Housing Options





Posted by Heidi Mahoney on 8/17/2015

There are so many details that go into moving we often forget the emotional aspect of transitioning to a new home. For children this can be especially difficult. Often for children, the house and neighborhood they currently live in may be the only home they have ever known. Moving can be a particularly stressful event for a child. Here are some tips to help ease the transition: 1. Have a family meeting After you have made your plans to move, hold a family meeting to talk with your children. Share your feelings about the move and encourage your children to do the same. Expressing the positive aspects of the move can be helpful, also share that you may be feeling a little nervous too. 2. Make room plans Take your children to visit their new home or at least show them pictures. This may help ease their concerns. Let them be involved in their new home by picking out the paint colors or the furniture layout of their new space. Children will often be more receptive if they feel included in the process. 3. Make a map of local points of interest Your new home most likely has some fun things for children nearby. Go online or draw a map showing your new home and places that your children may enjoy like the library, soccer field, playground and other fun places. This will help your child feel excited and help them learn more about their new neighborhood. 4. Visit the new school If possible take your children to visit their new school before their first day. It will be helpful to meet the teachers and see the school's surroundings beforehand. 5. Throw a “See You Soon” party One of the most difficult things about moving is saying goodbye. Hosting a “See You Soon” party helps your children understand that goodbye is not forever. Make sure to get all of their friend's phone numbers and email addresses so they can keep in touch. Remember to take a lot of pictures at the party as well. Sending the photos to the friends they have left behind is another way of keeping in touch. Most of all you should try to keep things as normal as possible. You may need to hug a little more and check in with older children to help ease the anxiety. Soon they will have new friends and new things to look forward to.  







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